Hillary Raimondi leverages her extensive and diverse experience in order to provide employers, municipalities and professionals with accessible, responsive, and effective representation at the administrative level, in arbitration, at mediation and in state and federal courts.

Leader of the firm’s Employment Practices Group and a partner in its New York office, Hillary prides herself on providing her clients with effective communication and thorough, thoughtful representation. Hillary builds that representation on a foundation of preparation, attention to detail, and a passion for helping her clients achieve their litigation and business goals.

Accessible, responsive, well-prepared and well-informed, Hillary concentrates her practice on employment litigation, including a wide range of matters at the administrative level (EEOC, New York State Division of Human Rights, New York City Commission on Human Rights) as well as in state and federal courts and in binding arbitration. She represents employers in claims for discrimination (gender, disability, race, age, religion, national origin, sexual orientation), sexual harassment, and retaliation brought pursuant to Title VII, the New York State Human Rights Law, the New York City Human Rights Law, the ADA, the FMLA, the ADEA, and various other anti-discrimination statutes.

Hillary also defends employers in wage and hour litigation under the FLSA and the New York Wage Theft Protection Act, including class and collective actions. Handling cases from inception through appeal and/or settlement, Hillary has successfully negotiated and/or mediated settlements in complex cases in a variety of settings, including with judges, magistrates, private mediators, and at the EEOC.

A significant portion of Hillary’s practice includes representing attorneys, insurance and real estate brokers and agents, and other professionals in the defense of claims arising from alleged malpractice, breach of fiduciary duty, and other claims of alleged misconduct. She protects the interest of municipalities, and their officers and employees, in civil rights cases under 42 U.S.C. Section 1983 for alleged constitutional violations by police, prosecutors, correction officers and in the employment context.

Education

  • Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law, J.D., cum laude
  • Binghamton University, B.A.

Bar Admissions

  • New York

Court Admissions

  • U.S. District Court, Southern District of New York 
  • U.S. District Court, Northern District of New York
  • U.S. District Court, Eastern District of New York
  • U.S.Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit

Professional Affiliations

  • Member-Eastern Chapter Steering Committee-Professional Liability Underwriting Society (PLUS)
  • New York State Bar Association
  • The Westchester Women’s Bar Association, Past Chair of the Employment Law Committee
  • Claims and Litigation Management Alliance (CLM)
  • Defense Research Institute-DRI